This website uses cookies to improve site functionality and to provide you with a better browsing experience. You can learn more about our use of cookies on the website by reading our Cookie Notice. By using this website or clicking OK, you consent to the use of cookies.

OK
5 World Trade Center. Rendering by dbox.
5 World Trade Center. Rendering by dbox.
Dezeen sites Azrieli Tower as an example of a mixed-use skyscraper
Dezeen sites Azrieli Tower as an example of a mixed-use skyscraper
/ People / Press

James von Klemperer Speaks with Dezeen about Skyscraper Evolution post 9/11

The Park Hyatt Suzhou and Suzhou IFS were recognized as finalists in the Best Hotel & Tourism and Mixed-Use Development categories, respectively. Winners will be announced on December 8th in a ceremony at the Grand Hyatt in Hong Kong.

Located next to Jinji Lake’s beautiful waterfront park, the Park Hyatt Suzhou re-imagines the world-renowned gardens of Suzhou in a residential-inspired hotel. The project connects guests to Suzhou’s landscape tradition with rooms and amenities that open directly onto internal and external gardens. Within the stepped massing, many rooms have private terraces and all have landscape views designed to provide an experience more akin to an intimate vacation home than a hotel. A showcase of craftsmanship, style and design sensibilities, the hotel aims to provide a contemporary destination-level hospitality experience along the historic lakefront.

Derived as a direct response to its site and context, the Suzhou IFS Tower is a modern, technological, and symbolic embodiment of Suzhou’s identity with a sinuous form that helps to organize its various programs. With a design appropriately inspired by a fish, a symbol of wealth prosperity in China, the structure houses a highly complex mixed-use project within a singular form that, at 450 meters in height, marks the center of Suzhou’s modern expansion. The project is comprised of luxury office, hospitality, and residential programs placed within a form that reminisces the old city. The building’s curved tail allows its form to transition from the nearby Jinji Lake and surrounding lower buildings up through the tower, which gently twists to gesture back toward the water.

The MIPIM panel of expert judges reviewed close to 100 entries from 10 countries, shortlisting only three projects for each of the 11 competition categories. View all the finalists and learn more about the MIPIM Awards here.