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/ Events

KPF Hosts Delft University Graduate Students

On Tuesday, November 11th, Stefan Al, Senior Associate Principal, and the KPF design teams for One Vanderbilt and 10 & 30 Hudson Yards discussed each project with students in the Master City Developer course, a part-time master’s program for professionals organized by the University.

Led by Senior Associate Principal Nicole McGlinn, the presentation on One Vanderbilt focused on a range of topics – from the city planning approvals process and early design to final design, coordination and execution. KPF’s work on 10 & 30 Hudson Yards was presented by Terri Lee, Senior Associate Principal, and highlighted the history of the Hudson Yards development, the design intent behind the two buildings, and the structural strategies deployed to construct the towers.

Set to become the tallest office tower in Midtown, One Vanderbilt will skillfully meet the market demands of Midtown East as it transforms the civic experience of the Grand Central District. One Vanderbilt fits into the city's network of public transport more than any other building in the city, blending private enterprise and the public realm. The base of the building becomes part of the spatial sequence of Grand Central and a doorstep to the city, greeting thousands of commuters daily. An integrated complex of below grade conditions offers connections to the terminal, the new East Side Access and an active urban base.

Anchoring the largest private real estate development in U.S. history, 10 & 30 Hudson Yards embrace the prevailing character of the West Side and announce the burgeoning neighborhood with a fresh visual dynamic. Requiring both design excellence and complex project planning and engineering, the towers are part of the new 28-acre neighborhood, and are built on a platform above the Long Island Rail Road rail yard, the country’s busiest train, at the point where 30 rail tracks converge into four before entering Penn Station.